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the presidency, said, and the house and did not like george bush very much. sure hated losing to them in 2004. they did not quit. they kept working. they took the house and the senate and the white house. it played by the rules. we took them back in 2010. never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. these things are difficult because it is always easy to say try it. we are doing is now working. usually what that means is we need to work harder for we doing . i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. i hated it. it took 16 years to get ronald reagan. but when we got ronald reagan it changed america and the world and ended the old soviet system. so democracy is hard work, stuff like this, people going in knocking on doors, people, you know, going out and voting. we do it. our system works. it's hard to work, and it's hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. very afraid of centralized powerful government. it will make this difficult to do. but power announcer representatives with the people, the states every year, president that for four ye
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
served as the chief economist of the council of economic advisers under president george bush. manuel pastor is the professor of sociology in american studies and ethnicity at the university of southern california. he's also the director of their program on environmental and region aleck bity -- regional equity, and for our purposes today most importantly, codirector of the center for the study of immigrant integration. and he's published a couple of reports recently that he'll bring to light today about the importance of citizenship. jose antonio vargas is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist, film maker and the founder of define american, a campaign that seeks to elevate the immigration conversation. he is another profile in courage. in 2011 in "the new york times" magazine, he publicly revealed himself as undocumented and shared his life story of being raised by his grandparents in the u.s. from the age of 12 when he left his birthplace in the philippines. he has since become a national immigrants' rights advocate and leader for comprehensive immigration reform activist including th
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impatient. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that when he is gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very safe. i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spin you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son had major surgery. for our procedure. but, you know, what? that's a price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i paid f
that both in terms of his experience here at the george george bush institute but more partly in terms of his experience as an army officer. >> thank you robert payday would like to start out by wishing congratulations to our newest citizens. my experience over the past 24 years as active military service has been in our our most engage service-oriented and patriotic citizens and servicemembers are our newest. and so as the director of the military service initiatives here i had the honor and responsibility to lead the bush institute's effort to honor the service and sacrifice of all of their post-9/11 veterans military servicemembers and their families but also to empower and unite the efforts of non-profits businesses universities individual citizens and communities to improve the well-being of those veteran servicemembers and their families but also to release their potential to continue to serve as national assets in their communities after their military service is over. and so since september 11, 2001, 2.3 million members of this country have gone -- worn the uniform in iraq or a
by president clinton in 197 and vry bipartisan, as she continued to serve under president george w. bush until 2002. before being the administer of faa shows both the acting deputy administrator of the federal highway administration. she was the logan airport in boston manager, and she currently heads the u.s. public-private partnership at jpmorgan. most importantly, she is past chairman of the bipartisan policy center board of directors here, and continues to be a board member with us. so in 1997, ms. garvey, when you first took over at the a, the agency was being about $9 billion. and charlie before you arrived, the agency itself had estimated that you would need 10 billion annually to meet growing passenger usage and also for of course protecting the safety of the flying public. and yet as i recall, the budget resolution that year were only going to project only going to budget of 7a half billion, or two and a half billion dollars gap. further complicating your job as you were coming in, and assessment of the agency was mandated by 1996 agency reauthorization act, and it concluded, and i qu
the reasoning behind why george bush wanted to sell the ports and did he contact beforehand? >> host: i think he is referring to, 2004 at the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. >> guest: i certainly remember that. >> guest: we consider privatizing the ports here in norfolk. we had several bids but i think in the fullness of time i decided to keep it stayed on. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: there was a reason i sent and the caller, that's also true. the color i believe is referring to when there was a discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a company that was foreign controlled and that came to a full hault. >> host: what does it mean to you guys that this is sustained sustained-state-owned entity versus a private company? >> guest: frankly is run in the public good and if it's privately-owned you have to maximize short-term profits. if its government-owned we can look at the long-term benefit to the commonwealth of virginia and i think that is the one thing i am delighted that we did not sell. just being responsible we had to consider all of the
george bush when he talked about this program when it was first revealed by "the new york times." he said, well, when al qaeda and call somebody in the united states, i want to know who they're calling. that's kind of the underlying philosophy of this program, and i think it's the purpose. we're talking, it tends to spill over into people thinking, well, maybe we are monitoring their actual content of the conversation and we're not. it's medicaid, records, effectively the outside of the envelope that is put in your mailbox. it's that information that is on the envelope. and the date stamp and the postmark. >> would you have people believe that metadata have no significant privacies? i would rather if i had a choice, i hope not have either of these choices, of having every phone conversation i have for 30 days listening to them which, of course, is impractical to have a large number of people doing that, or all my metadata collected for 30 days? i would much rather -- >> collected by proctor and gamble oracle victoria beckham corporation, then i would be worried. and i think sometimes we d
on the consulate. if this had been george bush and you had a republican, there would not have -- candy crowley, the way she answered herself to jump to the president's defense in that third debate or second debate was so inappropriate. it went beyond the pale. and i really don't believe that if that was a republican incumbent she would have jumped in like that. going back to the 2008 campaign the president's relationship with the rev. jeremiah right, is rare print for 20 years, obama belonged to is church. he had incendiaries sermons that he gave. he baptizes children, married -- de presided over the marriage between president obama and michele. and that really got scant attention by the mainstream media. these were all full sermons that he gave saying that basically americans deserve what they have i won't repeat a lot of the awful things that the reference said. but also really the president's failed record in his first term. the media did not hold the president accountable. when the president said, if i can't get the job done in four years i should be a one-term president. if he said that,
and human services from 2001 to 2005. he was appointed by president george w. bush. most recently for the record the governor joined the bipartisan policy center here as a senior adviser and we welcome him very much to the organization. governor, the budget when you took over in 2001 was about $380 billion is my record here. along with social security the was the largest and is the largest still today of the domestic agency. when you left at the end of 2004 it had grown $200 billion to over 580 billion-dollar agency. during your tenure you were hit with a slew of emergencies, anthrax, post 911, concerns over bioterrorism, the flu and the need to stockpile the smallpox vaccine. you also cleared up the plans to expand health insurance coveragn so when i look at your budget i know we are supposed to talk about constrained budgets but one might conclude you had no budget constraints on your agency but omb and barry anderson gave you a budget tie line. how did you go about and did the congress and particularly place restraints under congressional a budget that you hadn't anticipated cl
-span today. and update, former president george w. bush has successfully undergone a heart procedure after doctors discovered a blockage in an artery. a bush spokesman said a stent was inserted. the blockage was discovered yesterday during mr. bush's annual physical. the spokesman said the blockage was open with no complication, and that the 67 year old bush is expected to be discharged tomorrow. while we wait for the next session, a daylong discussion on protecting the nation's electric grid. we'll hear from nsa and cia director, former nsa and cia director michael hayden. he spoke to the group today about cybersecurity and challenges facing industry and how much protection expect to get from the government. >> well, good morning, and thanks to have a chance to chat with you today. i will try to limit my transmission of your to about 20 minutes or so and then leave about 15 minutes for any questions or comments that yo have. as suggested, my purpose here's what my army buddies used to call a briefing with a big hand and the little mouth. i get to do the strategic overview. and what you ha
criticizing the administration's -- we cut the budget and increased the overseas activities. george w. bush didn't run for president carried back to the 2008 campaign literature he didn't run promising a defense buildup and he wasn't intending to make foreign policy the center of his foreign policy than he wound up making as we know one of the most hardest decisions in history about the war of choice in iraq. so i don't think that cutting our military is going to be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and results and sustain the balance. that means we can make the economies and defense but not cuts like sequestration. >> mackenzie, you're concluding thoughts? >> i think that was very good. there isn't much to add except i wouldn't put all my eggs in one basket is basically the summary. all i want peace through strength or a modern day version of it, because i want a military that the tours. talking on the military front i want all those other things, too. i want strong allies, i want our partners capacity to be robust enough to defend themselves
's an attorney. he worked in several capacities when george w. bush was the founder of texas. the halon affiliation and they were delighted that stuart bowen has developed such innovative and attractive materials to understand. i think it really is held that there's a lot of visual presentation of lessons and iraq and the very complicated story of funding what didn't work very well. and how we can do betterh next te. we have invited stuart bowen to meet his presentations first. we will then turn to jim schear, who has recently finished his second tour of the pentagon as an assistant secretary for responsibility for stability operations in his earlier career he was a research scholar at the national defense university, director of research there and worked throughout his career on these questions of stabilization and reconstruction including at the u.n. and some of its early post of war success stories in cambodia, the balkans and elsewhere. so how did stuart bowen ideas, what kind of responses were there more broadly in the pentagon and the interagency community and his own reflections
happened with george bush, of course. didn't call it recess. he called it looking to putin's eye and seeing his soul thinking he could understand the guy and do business. it didn't take him long to find out he didn't really have it right. there was no fallback, after that, i think it was the same situation. of just, you know, floundering about not knowing exactly how to deal with the russians. so yes, it really comes down to the person of valid my putin. it was always a sense of vladmir putin. things have definitely shifted since he announced he would come back and all of, by the way, the processes set in motion inside of russia. i'll thought about later. i think it's shaping very much how putin deals not only in domestic -- politics but foreign politicses. it's the lack of a notion how to deal with putin is kind of in the heart of a lot of these problem. >> that could be hard. he's a unique -- personality. i guess maybe we can sort of follow on that by pivoting off of cliff's point it's a little bit difficult to discern what the american strategy toward russia is. i have a lot of trouble d
george w. bush and principal deputy press secretary. and john verrico, president-elect of the national association of government communicators. so starting with carolyn, let's hear what you have to say, give us your overview of the subject. >> i'm going to tell you about a couple surveys i've conducted this year, and the previous year. that are relevant to the topic we're discussing tonight. first, i surveyed reporters who cover federal agencies here in washington. i've got 146 respondents within margin of error of about 7%. then i surveyed current and former members of the national association of government communicate is, at 154 responses from a margin of error of about 4.3%. i'm going to throw some numbers at you but i want to quantify the situation. my questions focus on the indie thing process. for someone to talk about preapproval and routing. 98% of public affairs officers believe that they have a better idea than reporters about who in the agencies would be the best person to give an interview on a given topic. three quarters of journalists report they have to give approval fro
on the others i think it's a war. medal was approved by congress, not a dime ever voted for it. had george w. bush had done that i think we would have heard cries of impeachment. we are part of our immigration laws, and i was suspended by the president when the year before he said he couldn't do that. there's just a variety of issues like that when he's gone outside. we have to tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president, but this one is very cities. you will see it continue. but there will be legal cases. all the way back. i'm going to try to bounce around all of it. it begin, we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you can remove on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i think the other speaker i speak from my point of view -- applaud not this is not theoretical because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. a four-hour procedure. that's the price i pay for the liberty of my children. i'm se
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
, and that is former president george h.w. bush. i've had, i had a chance to work with him, incredible leader, an incredible human being who has given so much back to the community. as president of the united states, but as former president of the united states. so i am honored to stand in for him today. he apologizes, but -- [laughter] we've been talking a lot about work force and whether we have the right people in lace to provide the services -- in place to provide the services. you're the front line. you're the absolute front line. and for people to be able to get quality, affordable health care, they have to be able to come through that door and be accepted and have confidence that they're going to be treated with the care that they expect. and you have provided that. and you have done that as a volunteer. which is just remarkable from the point of view of if we could clone you and have you throughout -- [laughter] it would make life a lot easier. we've talked a lot also about how do you get people into the system, and you personally have gotten people into the system because of the mann
terrorism was partially because george w. bush hated in the muslim world. despite his speech in cairo, despite his efforts to close guantanamo, despite his elimination of the use of the term war on terror, al qaeda continues to hate america. and even as i speak to you here today, they continue to plan attacks against america here and around the world. the president's not alone in failing to confront these threats. i'm afraid because of the success we've had in preventing another attack on the scale of 9/11, some of our leaders in both parties have been lulled into a sense of false security. i certainly support the privacy rights and expectations of all americans. but my colleagues, i also know for a fact that the surveillance programs that our government used have prevented attacks and saved american lives. i think it's a mistake to dismiss privacy concerns as crazy. after all, we have a government whose tax collecting agency targeted americans because of their political views. but it's also a mistake to exaggerate them. after all, if a known terrorist is e-mailing or calling someone
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20